Date for the Diary: 27th September. Announcing a change to the next TAS Lecture | Street House Before the Saxons With TAS Member Dr. Stephen Sherlock in which he will be presenting, for the first time, news of a recently excavated site “of regional or perhaps national significance”

27th September | Street House Before the Saxons  Dr. Steven Sherlock 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

Unfortunately, due to research commitments Debora Moretti has had to cancel her September lecture.  We are delighted, however, that Stephen Sherlock has agreed to provide a talk on the amazing archaeology that has been revealed at Street House extending from earliest times up to the creation of Anglo-Saxon cemetery.
IA Rhouses

Excavations at Street House, near Loftus, since 1980 have revealed a wealth of evidence for different sites for most periods in British Archaeology. The sites range from Neolithic burial sites, Bronze Age burials, ritual or ceremonial sites and settlements, Iron Age farmstead, village and industry, a Romano-British farmstead, settlement and evidence for jet, salt and pottery manufacturing.

image-10-roman-villa-archaeological-dig-near-loftus-737766876

All of this was before the creation of a Royal Anglo-Saxon cemetery of national significance at the site. However, excavations in the last two years have revealed another site, not mentioned so far, that  is also of regional or perhaps national significance. This additional site will be presented in this lecture for the first time.

About the Speaker.

steveTAS member Steve Sherlock  has been a professional archaeologist for 36 years and has spent much of that time working in North East England. Much of his research has been focused on East Cleveland where he has undertaken a number of major excavations particularly on Iron Age and Anglo-Saxon sites. Commercially he has also excavated and published on later sites including medieval settlements at Castleton and Long Marston. He has been the archaeological clerk of works, working on the A1 road improvements in North Yorkshire, as well as other projects in the area. His work is published in regional journals and conference proceedings and in 2012 he published two Tees Archaeology monographs.

Street House Farm

The Street House Farm story is on display at Kirkleatham Museum. The display includes some of the rarest Anglo-Saxon finds ever discovered, shedding light on the extraordinary life of the Anglo-Saxon princess. The stunning collection found in Loftus, contains pendants and beads that have enabled a reconstructed Royal bed burial dating back to the 7th Century. Admission free and well worth a visit.

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 26 May | Early Medieval Perceptions of the Past: Identity and the Prehistoric in Anglo-Saxon England

May 26 | Early Medieval Perceptions of the Past: Identity and the Prehistoric in Anglo-Saxon England | Dr Sarah Semple, Durham University. 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

The prehistoric and Roman inhabitants of England left a rich repertoire of monuments and remains. In the post Roman aftermath, the communities that struggled to redefine themselves and their control over landscape and resources, began to creatively draw upon these physical and material legacies. The natural landscape exerted a pFigure 6.10rofound shaping effect on territory, the legacy of the prehistoric and Roman past. Barrows, enclosures, forts—as well as Roman and Romano-British places and remains—proved key to the flourishing of new communities, and the ancient and more recent monuments in the landscape were drawn upon in the creation of new stories of origins, power and descent. This presentation explores how these processes helped shape the local world view of communities and how, by the 6th and 7th centuries, emerging elite and royal power began to exploit and harness ancient monuments and the landscape for their own, new ambitious vision of power.

About the speaker

Sarah’s research focuses on the early medieval period in Britain and Northern Europe. She is especially interested in understanding early medieval interaction with the natural and man-made environment with particular reference to the role of landscape in definitions of identity, religion and cult practice, as well as charting the ideological and political uses of natural topography and ancient remains.

Figure 3.3Recent publications include: Anglo-Saxon Perceptions of the Prehistoric. Ritual, Religion and Rulership (2013) and Signals of Belief in Anglo-saxon England (2010). She recently completed a collaborative project exploring the important monastic sites of Wearmouth and Jarrow. Further regional involvements include field investigation at Yeavering, Northumberland, Sockburn, County Durham and at Etal on the Northumberland border.

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 25 Nov | Steve Sherlock: Anglo-Saxon Teesside Redated

IMG_1313WNovember 25 | Anglo-Saxon Teesside: 30 years on from the Norton Saxon Cemetery | Stephen Sherlock, Archaeologist Extraordinaire

7.30pm in Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Please remember to bring your membership card or a completed application form to join. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

FINDS HANDLING!


Anglo-Saxon remains were initially found in a field beside Mill Lane, Norton in 1982 and the site was excavated in 1984-5. This proved to be the largest sixth-century cemetery to have been excavated in North East England and is frequently discussed as the northern example of Saxon cemeteries in England. Over the intervening period, the dates of some Anglo-Saxon objects have been reviewed and so one theme Steve will address in his lecture will be the date of the Norton cemetery.

Since 1984 other cemeteries have been excavated in the Tees Valley, for example at Ingleby Barwick in 2003. Furthermore, stray finds have been reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme. The second theme will be to update the known burial record for Anglo-Saxon cemeteries in the Tees Valley. This will incorporate the latest discoveries to include new finds and burials found in the area in 2013.

Silver pendants and bead from excavations at Norton Anglo-Saxon cemetery where revised dates are argued. Not to scale (courtesy Tees Archaeology). Header image is a re-used pendant from the Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Street House, Loftus (S. Sherlock).

The last theme for the talk will be the placement of objects within the grave. Anglo-Saxon burials have always interested people because of the range of attractive objects found in the grave. Traditionally these “grave goods” were seen as the personal possessions of the deceased. A more recent view considers some objects to be items placed by mourners at the grave side. Steve will also look at the role of heirlooms and antiques, possibly passed down from one generation to the next, that are for a short period of time in the seventh century, placed within graves.

References
Sherlock, S.J. 2011. Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries in the Tees Valley and Association with Neolithic and Later Monuments, in S. Brooks, S. Harrington and A. Reynolds (eds) Studies in Early Anglo-Saxon Art and Archaeology: Papers in Honour of Martin G Welch, BAR British Series 527, 112–120. Oxford: Archaeopress.
Sherlock, S.J. 2012.  A Royal Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Street House, Loftus, North East Yorkshire. Hartlepool: Tees Archaeology Monograph 6.
Sherlock, S.J. and Simmons, M. 2008. The Lost Royal Cult of Street House, Yorkshire. British Archaeology 100, 30–37.
Sherlock, S.J. and Welch, M.G. 1992. An Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Norton, Cleveland. London: Council for British Archaeology Research Report 82.
Sherlock, S.J. and Welch, M.G. 1992. Anglo-Saxon Objects from Maltby, Cleveland. Durham Archaeological Journal 8, 71–76.

See you there!

Kind Regards,

Spencer Carter | TAS Chair & eCommunications