TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 25th July| Durham’s Museum of Archaeology and its Collections | Gemma Lewis

July 4th | TAS Lecture: Durham’s Museum of Archaeology and its Collections | Gemma Lewis 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU (Doors open at 7.00pm). Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

Durham opened its first museum in 1833, just a year after the founding of the University. The Archaeology Museum, in Palace Green Library, Durham.  is the successor of this original University Museum.

In this lecture, Gemma will discuss the collections held in the Museum.revealing what was found of the earlier industrial and social history of this part of the city.

 

About the speaker

Gemma is the Deputy Curator of University College, Deputy Curator of the Castle in the Library and Curator of Durham Castle and the Museum of Archaeology in the Castle.

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TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 28th February | Death and Discovery | David Dance, Freelance Archaeologist

Tuesday 28th February | Death and Discovery | David Dance 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU (Doors open at 7.00pm). Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

David will discuss the use of Archaeology in Forensic Investigation, exploring the origins of Forensic Archaeology, and its application within criminal investigations of missing or suspected dead persons, with a practical demonstration of Forensic Archaeology in action.

About the speaker

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David with Assistant

David started working life as a hospital Staff nurse, changing career to the Metropolitan Police in 1980. He served for 30 years reaching the rank of Inspector, and in 1992-1994 studied for a BSc Degree in Policing at Portsmouth University. His last 16 years of service was within a Specialist Firearms Unit.

He Studied Archaeology and History at Birkbeck College, London University, focusing on Greek and Roman History; and is a member of the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House. On retirement from the Metropolitan Police, he undertook a full time Master’s Degree, Forensic Archaeological Science, at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.

David moved to East Cleveland from Essex in 2011 and has been a member of TAS since 2012.

Friday 4th March 7.pm at Low Worsall Village Hall – Time Team and High Worsall Medieval Village with Robin Daniels

In October 1997 Channel 4’s Time Team produced a programme on the Deserted Medieval Village at High Worsall uncovering buildings and investigating farmsteads. The Time Team project was filmed by a local person and this event will be an opportunity to view this film with a commentary by the photographer. There will also be an opportunity to view some of the finds from the excavations and talk to Robin Daniels, who led the archaeology team at the site.

You will also be able to learn more about an excavation project in the village of Low Worsall which will take place in April of this year.

The programme for the evening is:-

7pm for 7.30pm start

  1. Power point intro.
  2. Questions – general discussion and opportunity to look at ‘finds’
  3. Break for glass of wine etc
  4. Video of Time Team event.

 

Robin Daniels, Tees Archaeology

 

 

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 29th March | The dead DO tell tales | Dr. Andrew Millard

March 29 |The dead DO tell tales Dr Andrew Millard, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology at Durham University7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

A development site at Cliff’s End Farm, Ramsgate, Kent yielded an extraordinary set Cliff’s End primary burialof burials. The primary burial was carefully arranged but she had been executed by a blow to the back of the head. Other incomplete burials had been rearranged while partially fleshed. Radiocarbon dating shows that they range in date from the late Bronze Age to the middle Iron Age. In this lecture I will explore how isotope analysis has revealed even more about their origins and diet. The people from the site include probable locals, but also an extraordinary range of migrants. Some came from across the North Sea, while others came from a long way south of Britain. The remains from Cliff’s End have major implications for our understanding of trade and migration in this part of prehistory.

About the Speaker

Dr Millard graduated from Oxford University with a degree in chemistry however aAndrew-Millard growing interest in archaeology led him to undertake doctoral work in the Research Laboratory for Archaeology at Oxford. In 1995 he took up a position as lecturer at Durham University where his research has broadened to cover the chemistry of bones and teeth applied to archaeological problems, and Bayesian statistics applied to archaeology, particularly to the analysis of scientific dating techniques, and with wider applications in Quaternary science.

For further information, links and bibliography click here.

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 23 February | St Cuthbert’s Corpse | David Williams

Feb 23rd | TAS Lecture | St Cuthbert’s Corpse – a life after death | David Williams 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

The miracle of St Cuthbert’s incorrupt corpse has been the subject of much fascination18154896 since his death, inspiring pilgrims, monks, and even the construction of Durham Cathedral itself. St Cuthbert’s coffin was opened six times in 1300 years and on each occasion someone kept a record of the body and relics as they were found – Anglo-Saxon monks, the first kings of all England, the Normans, Henry VIII’s henchman, a Georgian antiquarian and Victorian scholars – all bringing different preoccupations and concerns to the same body of material.

David is the author of ‘St Cuthbert’s Corpse – a life after death’, published under the pen name David Willem, . In this talk, David will draw upon research for this book, charting the history of St. Cuthbert’s body through time.

About the speaker

Dr David Williams

David Williams is Alumni Relations Manager at Durham University. He has twenty-three years of experience in communications, mostly at the interface between universities and the wider world and as a freelance journalist. He is the author of Kicking: Following the Fans to the Orient and a former correspondent for The Guardian and The Times.

 

 

TAS LECTURE AND AGM | Reminder for Tue 26 January | AGM | Recent developments at Vindolanda | Lauren Wilkinson

Jan 26th | TAS AGM plus Vindolanda: Recent Developments | Lauren Wilkinson 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

Vindolanda lies just to the south of the curtain wall of Hadrian’s Wall and has a very different ‘feel’ to other sites along the Wall. It lies upon the first Roman frontier in the north – The Stanegate Road and in a stunning landscape which lets your imagination
really connect with its past. Although first built by the Roman army before Hadrian’s Wall Vindolanda became an important construction and garrison base for the Wall, a Hadrian’s Wall fort in its own right. During this time Vindolanda was demolished and completely re-built no fewer than nine times. Each re-build, each community, leaving their own distinctive mark on the landscape and archaeology of the site. After Hadrian’s Wall and the Roman occupation was abandoned by its imperial armies Vindolanda remained in use for over 400 years before finally becoming abandoned in the 9th century.
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Annual excavations have been carried out at Vindolanda for many years and have produced some stunning remains including the famous writing tablets, the finest collection of Roman footwear from the Roman Empire, textiles, pottery, militaria and personal items from the communities that lived there.

About the speaker

Lauren Wilkinson is Site Education Officer at Vindolanda Charitable Trust. She graduated
in Archaeology at Newcastle University and has worked at various museums across the North East in both front of house and education Lauren croppedroles, including Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens, Discovery Museum, and Great North Museum: Hancock where she developed a passion in Roman archaeology. Lauren planned and delivered Roman based projects funded by the British Museum, as well as delivering many workshops, talks and tours for children and adults before being appointed to her current role at Vindolanda. In this lecture she will be bringing us up to date with the latest developments at this fascinating site.

 

ELGEE MEMORIAL LECTURE | Sat. 5th Dec. | The Rise and Fall of the Late Iron Age Royal Centre at Stanwick, North Yorkshire | Professor Colin Haselgrove, University of Leicester

ELGEE MEMORIAL LECTURE | Sat. 5th Dec. | The Rise and Fall of the Late Iron Age Royal Centre at Stanwick, North Yorkshire | Professor Colin Haselgrove, University of Leicester | 10:30am at the Dorman Museum, Linthorpe Road, Middlesbrough TS5 6LA | Free Entry

Click here for tickets (Opens new page)

The enormous earthwork complex at Stanwick, west of Darlington—enclosing nearly three square kilometres—is the largest continuous prehistoric fortification in Britain, comparable to some of the most important late Age settlements in continental Europe.
Stanwick was first excavated in 1951–52 by Sir Mortimer Wheeler who believed that the earthworks were constructed by an anti-Roman faction of the BrigantStanwick Planes between the invasion of southern England in AD 43 and the annexation of the north in the AD 70s. A very different interpretation of Stanwick has emerged as a result of excavations there by Durham University in the 1980s and further research in the environs over the past 25 years. Radiocarbon dating shows that Stanwick was occupied from the early 1st century BC. The early settlement differed little from others in the Tees valley, but soon after 50 BC, the site was reorganised and fortified, and successive monumental timber structures were built. Imports from other parts of Britain and the continent imply that well before the Roman invasion, Stanwick had attained a similar level of importance to known royal centres elsewhere in Britain and Ireland.

Soon after in AD 43, Cartimandua, the ruler of the Brigantes, entered into a treaty with the invaders. Many unusual Roman goods dating to this period recovered in the excavations must have been gifts showered on the queen, whose residence Stanwick surely was, and the massive perimeter earthwork was constructed in a display of her prestige. However, her rule over the Brigantes did not last. In AD 69, after a rebellion led by Venutius, her estranged consort, Cartimandua sought the protection of the Romans. They quickly set about the permanent conquest of the region—and Stanwick was abandoned. As well as illuminating the social and political dynamics of the period, the research has cast new light on the everyday lives of the Iron Age inhabitants of the Tees Valley and their ritual and mortuary practices, some of which were continued by the agricultural population of the area in the Roman period.

About the speaker

Colin Haselgrove has been Professor of Archaeology at the University of CH ImageLeicester since 2005. Between 1977 and 2004, he taught in the Archaeology department at Durham University where he was made a Professor in 1995. His research focuses on the British and European Iron Age, on the Iron Age to Roman transition in north-west Europe, and on early coinage and currencies. Colin is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Societies of Antiquaries of London and Scotland. He was Head of the School of Archaeology and Ancient History at Leicester from 2006–12.

Dr FFrank_Elgeerank Elgee was born in 1880 in North Ormesby and was curator at the Dorman Museum from 1904 to 1944.The memorial lectures have run annually since 1968, hosted in turn by the archaeological, historical and natural history societies of Teesside. The 2015 lecture is hosted by the Teesside Archaeological Society.

Header image copyright English Heritage

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 24 November | Operation Nightingale: Cyprus to Catterick 2014–15 | Phil Abramson and Steve Sherlock

Nov. 24 | Operation Nightingale: Cyprus to Catterick 2014–15 | Phil Abramson and Steve Sherlock 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

This talk will present the latest updates about a leading-edge initiative to provide training
skills and rehabilitation for people who have been involved in conflict. Members of all three military services have participated in archaeological projects on MOD sites, learning new DSC_0010skills after facing life-changing injuries and challenges After successful projects in the south of England on Salisbury plain with Wessex Archaeology, this presentation concerns a follow-on project in Cyprus during 2014 and one planned for Catterick in 2015. A dig was scheduled to take place at Marne Barracks, involving a commercial organisation and the Highways Agency for the first time. The results from these excavations will tie in to the current programme of work to upgrade the A1 in North Yorkshire.

About the speakersPhil_Steve_Cyprus
Phil Abramson is an archaeologist for the Defence Infrastructure Organisation. Steve Sherlock is Clerk of Works for the archaeological programme underway on the A1 motorway scheme in North Yorkshire. As TAS members will be aware, this particular double act is guaranteed to provide an informative and entertaining evening.

About Operation Nightingale

The Defence Archaeology Group and Operation Nightingale was founded in 2012 to utilise both the technical and social aspects of field archaeology in the recovery and skill
development of soldiers injured during the conflict in Afghanistan.
“It is less of a leap of faith to think that archaeology might be a discipline perfect for soldiers.”
There is a close correlation between the skills required by the modern soldier and those of the professional archaeologist. These skills include surveying, geophysics (for ordnance recovery or revealing cultural heritage sites), scrutiny of the ground (for improvised explosive devices or artefacts), site and team management, mapping, navigation and the physical ability to cope with hard manual work in often inclement weather conditions.
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TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 27 October | Disaster Recovery: Unearthing the Impact of the Black Death in Eastern England

October 27 | Disaster Recovery: Unearthing the Impact of the Black Death in Eastern England Dr Carenza Lewis, University of Lincoln. 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

Since 2005, thousands of members of the public, working with university archaeologists, have carried out nearly 2,000 small archaeological ‘test pit’ excavationsCRL at Llandeilo in more than 50 rural villages, towns and hamlets in eastern England, unearthing tens of thousands of pottery sherds. Analysis of this superficially unremarkable material is allowing archaeologists to map and measure changes in layout and density of settlements over centuries, and has revealed new evidence for the dramatic long-term impact of the set-backs of the 14th century AD which culminated in the Black Death of 1348–9. One strength of this approach is that it can potentially be used anywhere, and the talk will conclude by considering the potential for similar work in areas such as the Tees Valley.

About the speaker

Since 2004, Carenza Lewis MA ScD FSA has been Director of Access Cambridge Archaeology at the University of Cambridge, having previously carried out archaeological research for RCH2007_0627_140044 cropME (1986–99) and the University of Birmingham (1992–4) and presented Channel 4’s Time Team (1993–2005). Carenza has completed fieldwork and excavation on many sites across southern England and her research interests include medieval rural settlements and landscapes, the archaeology of children and childhood, widening participation in higher education and public engagement with heritage research. Her work has involved thousands of members of the public and was recognised in 2008 with an honorary doctorate from UEA and, in 2009, when shortlisted for the Marsh Award for Public Archaeology. Carenza has recently joined the University of Lincoln as Professor of Public Understanding of Research

CHANGE TO TAS LECTURE | Tue 29 September | A talk on Community Archaeology with Rebecca Hearne

September 29 | Community Archaeology Rebecca Hearne, Community Archaeologist at AOC Archaeology Group7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

Unfortunately, Mitchell Pollington of AOC is unable to give this months lecture as scheduled. He sends his apologies, however we are delighted that his colleague, Rebecca Hearne, has agreed to stand in to give us a talk on community archaeology generally as well as an overview of some of the community projects that AOC have been carrying out.

About the speaker

Rebecca Hearne is a Community Archaeologist with AOC Archaeology GroRebeccaup in York. After graduating with an MGeol in Applied and Environmental Geology with the University of Leicester and an MSc in Archaeological Materials with the University of Sheffield, Rebecca worked as a community archaeologist with Portals to the Past and as a field archaeologist with ULAS (University of Leicester Archaeological Services).