TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 23 February | St Cuthbert’s Corpse | David Williams

Feb 23rd | TAS Lecture | St Cuthbert’s Corpse – a life after death | David Williams 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

The miracle of St Cuthbert’s incorrupt corpse has been the subject of much fascination18154896 since his death, inspiring pilgrims, monks, and even the construction of Durham Cathedral itself. St Cuthbert’s coffin was opened six times in 1300 years and on each occasion someone kept a record of the body and relics as they were found – Anglo-Saxon monks, the first kings of all England, the Normans, Henry VIII’s henchman, a Georgian antiquarian and Victorian scholars – all bringing different preoccupations and concerns to the same body of material.

David is the author of ‘St Cuthbert’s Corpse – a life after death’, published under the pen name David Willem, . In this talk, David will draw upon research for this book, charting the history of St. Cuthbert’s body through time.

About the speaker

Dr David Williams

David Williams is Alumni Relations Manager at Durham University. He has twenty-three years of experience in communications, mostly at the interface between universities and the wider world and as a freelance journalist. He is the author of Kicking: Following the Fans to the Orient and a former correspondent for The Guardian and The Times.

 

 

TAS LECTURE REVIEW | TAS member Sara Gibson reviews our last lecture by Lauren Wilkinson on recent developments at Vindolanda.

TAS Lecture Review.

TAS member Sara Gibson reviews our last lecture by Lauren Wilkinson on recent developments at Vindolanda.

Lauren gave us an interesting and entertaining view of some of the findings and finds from the past year’s excavations at Vindolanda. As many will know, during the period of occupation the site included a fort and vicus which changed their location as the forts were rebuilt in each period of occupation. Of nine forts thought to have been built on the site during 1st – 5th Century, four have been excavated, at least in part. Below the later vicus, the Severan fort included two rows of roundhouses, the purpose of which is still unclear. The latest excavations have found what is thought could be a post-roman church apse with a water tank or ritual bathing pool nearby

.
Lauren spoke about two particular themes: Evidence of Children at Vindolanda has been found in the form of toy weapons, small shoes and writing tablets, in addition to a mysterious child’s burial found underneath the barracks floor. Her second theme concerned “Social Life”: apart from the well-known “birthday invitation” tablet, found a few years ago, games, drinking vessels bathing clogs, and the bath-houses themselves all paint a vivid picture of life at Vindolanda.
Finally, Lauren reminded us that the Vindolanda Charitable Trust runs a very popular volunteer excavation programme from March – September each year. There are still a few places available for 2016, and the programme for next year will open in November. Details on the website

TAS LECTURE AND AGM | Reminder for Tue 26 January | AGM | Recent developments at Vindolanda | Lauren Wilkinson

Jan 26th | TAS AGM plus Vindolanda: Recent Developments | Lauren Wilkinson 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

Vindolanda lies just to the south of the curtain wall of Hadrian’s Wall and has a very different ‘feel’ to other sites along the Wall. It lies upon the first Roman frontier in the north – The Stanegate Road and in a stunning landscape which lets your imagination
really connect with its past. Although first built by the Roman army before Hadrian’s Wall Vindolanda became an important construction and garrison base for the Wall, a Hadrian’s Wall fort in its own right. During this time Vindolanda was demolished and completely re-built no fewer than nine times. Each re-build, each community, leaving their own distinctive mark on the landscape and archaeology of the site. After Hadrian’s Wall and the Roman occupation was abandoned by its imperial armies Vindolanda remained in use for over 400 years before finally becoming abandoned in the 9th century.
wild001
Annual excavations have been carried out at Vindolanda for many years and have produced some stunning remains including the famous writing tablets, the finest collection of Roman footwear from the Roman Empire, textiles, pottery, militaria and personal items from the communities that lived there.

About the speaker

Lauren Wilkinson is Site Education Officer at Vindolanda Charitable Trust. She graduated
in Archaeology at Newcastle University and has worked at various museums across the North East in both front of house and education Lauren croppedroles, including Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens, Discovery Museum, and Great North Museum: Hancock where she developed a passion in Roman archaeology. Lauren planned and delivered Roman based projects funded by the British Museum, as well as delivering many workshops, talks and tours for children and adults before being appointed to her current role at Vindolanda. In this lecture she will be bringing us up to date with the latest developments at this fascinating site.

 

ELGEE MEMORIAL LECTURE | Sat. 5th Dec. | The Rise and Fall of the Late Iron Age Royal Centre at Stanwick, North Yorkshire | Professor Colin Haselgrove, University of Leicester

ELGEE MEMORIAL LECTURE | Sat. 5th Dec. | The Rise and Fall of the Late Iron Age Royal Centre at Stanwick, North Yorkshire | Professor Colin Haselgrove, University of Leicester | 10:30am at the Dorman Museum, Linthorpe Road, Middlesbrough TS5 6LA | Free Entry

Click here for tickets (Opens new page)

The enormous earthwork complex at Stanwick, west of Darlington—enclosing nearly three square kilometres—is the largest continuous prehistoric fortification in Britain, comparable to some of the most important late Age settlements in continental Europe.
Stanwick was first excavated in 1951–52 by Sir Mortimer Wheeler who believed that the earthworks were constructed by an anti-Roman faction of the BrigantStanwick Planes between the invasion of southern England in AD 43 and the annexation of the north in the AD 70s. A very different interpretation of Stanwick has emerged as a result of excavations there by Durham University in the 1980s and further research in the environs over the past 25 years. Radiocarbon dating shows that Stanwick was occupied from the early 1st century BC. The early settlement differed little from others in the Tees valley, but soon after 50 BC, the site was reorganised and fortified, and successive monumental timber structures were built. Imports from other parts of Britain and the continent imply that well before the Roman invasion, Stanwick had attained a similar level of importance to known royal centres elsewhere in Britain and Ireland.

Soon after in AD 43, Cartimandua, the ruler of the Brigantes, entered into a treaty with the invaders. Many unusual Roman goods dating to this period recovered in the excavations must have been gifts showered on the queen, whose residence Stanwick surely was, and the massive perimeter earthwork was constructed in a display of her prestige. However, her rule over the Brigantes did not last. In AD 69, after a rebellion led by Venutius, her estranged consort, Cartimandua sought the protection of the Romans. They quickly set about the permanent conquest of the region—and Stanwick was abandoned. As well as illuminating the social and political dynamics of the period, the research has cast new light on the everyday lives of the Iron Age inhabitants of the Tees Valley and their ritual and mortuary practices, some of which were continued by the agricultural population of the area in the Roman period.

About the speaker

Colin Haselgrove has been Professor of Archaeology at the University of CH ImageLeicester since 2005. Between 1977 and 2004, he taught in the Archaeology department at Durham University where he was made a Professor in 1995. His research focuses on the British and European Iron Age, on the Iron Age to Roman transition in north-west Europe, and on early coinage and currencies. Colin is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Societies of Antiquaries of London and Scotland. He was Head of the School of Archaeology and Ancient History at Leicester from 2006–12.

Dr FFrank_Elgeerank Elgee was born in 1880 in North Ormesby and was curator at the Dorman Museum from 1904 to 1944.The memorial lectures have run annually since 1968, hosted in turn by the archaeological, historical and natural history societies of Teesside. The 2015 lecture is hosted by the Teesside Archaeological Society.

Header image copyright English Heritage

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 24 November | Operation Nightingale: Cyprus to Catterick 2014–15 | Phil Abramson and Steve Sherlock

Nov. 24 | Operation Nightingale: Cyprus to Catterick 2014–15 | Phil Abramson and Steve Sherlock 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

This talk will present the latest updates about a leading-edge initiative to provide training
skills and rehabilitation for people who have been involved in conflict. Members of all three military services have participated in archaeological projects on MOD sites, learning new DSC_0010skills after facing life-changing injuries and challenges After successful projects in the south of England on Salisbury plain with Wessex Archaeology, this presentation concerns a follow-on project in Cyprus during 2014 and one planned for Catterick in 2015. A dig was scheduled to take place at Marne Barracks, involving a commercial organisation and the Highways Agency for the first time. The results from these excavations will tie in to the current programme of work to upgrade the A1 in North Yorkshire.

About the speakersPhil_Steve_Cyprus
Phil Abramson is an archaeologist for the Defence Infrastructure Organisation. Steve Sherlock is Clerk of Works for the archaeological programme underway on the A1 motorway scheme in North Yorkshire. As TAS members will be aware, this particular double act is guaranteed to provide an informative and entertaining evening.

About Operation Nightingale

The Defence Archaeology Group and Operation Nightingale was founded in 2012 to utilise both the technical and social aspects of field archaeology in the recovery and skill
development of soldiers injured during the conflict in Afghanistan.
“It is less of a leap of faith to think that archaeology might be a discipline perfect for soldiers.”
There is a close correlation between the skills required by the modern soldier and those of the professional archaeologist. These skills include surveying, geophysics (for ordnance recovery or revealing cultural heritage sites), scrutiny of the ground (for improvised explosive devices or artefacts), site and team management, mapping, navigation and the physical ability to cope with hard manual work in often inclement weather conditions.
DSC_0001     DSC_0005     DSC_0003

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 24 Feb | Roman Binchester: Dr David Petts

DSCF7440

February 24 | Roman Binchester: Barracks, Bath-houses and Belief at a Roman Fort | Dr David Petts, Durham University 7.30pm at Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

Members will be able to collect the TAS Bulletin journal 19 (2014-15), Membership cards and 2015 Programme cards. If you are paying or renewing a subscription, please complete a Membership Form.

FINDS HANDLING!


BinchestergodRecent excavations at Binchester have revealed unexpectedly good preservation of the underlying archaeology. This lecture will provide a chance to hear about the range of exciting discoveries made during the 2014 season of work at the site.

The most spectacular developments have been the uncovering of one of the best preserved Roman bath-houses in northern Britain. Standing in places over 2m high, this structure is one of the highlights of the project. However, exciting progress has been made elsewhere including unpicking the complex remains of a Roman cavalry barrack, and its associated latrine block, and the exploration of structures dating to the very final years of the Roman presence in Britain. Finally, this lecture will explore the increasing evidence we’ve found about the religious belief and ritual activities of the population of Roman Binchester, including a discussion of a rare early Christian ring found at the site.

ac250609arc5About the speaker

David Petts is a Lecturer of Archaeology at Durham University and has been leading the Binchester project since 2009. He is a specialist in early Christianity in Britain with a particular enthusiasm for early medieval monasticism, and is currently in the early stages of developing a research project to explore the archaeology of Holy Island (Lindisfarne).

See you there!

Explore the 2015 TAS Lecture Programme »

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 25 Nov | Steve Sherlock: Anglo-Saxon Teesside Redated

IMG_1313WNovember 25 | Anglo-Saxon Teesside: 30 years on from the Norton Saxon Cemetery | Stephen Sherlock, Archaeologist Extraordinaire

7.30pm in Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU. Please remember to bring your membership card or a completed application form to join. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door.

FINDS HANDLING!


Anglo-Saxon remains were initially found in a field beside Mill Lane, Norton in 1982 and the site was excavated in 1984-5. This proved to be the largest sixth-century cemetery to have been excavated in North East England and is frequently discussed as the northern example of Saxon cemeteries in England. Over the intervening period, the dates of some Anglo-Saxon objects have been reviewed and so one theme Steve will address in his lecture will be the date of the Norton cemetery.

Since 1984 other cemeteries have been excavated in the Tees Valley, for example at Ingleby Barwick in 2003. Furthermore, stray finds have been reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme. The second theme will be to update the known burial record for Anglo-Saxon cemeteries in the Tees Valley. This will incorporate the latest discoveries to include new finds and burials found in the area in 2013.

Silver pendants and bead from excavations at Norton Anglo-Saxon cemetery where revised dates are argued. Not to scale (courtesy Tees Archaeology). Header image is a re-used pendant from the Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Street House, Loftus (S. Sherlock).

The last theme for the talk will be the placement of objects within the grave. Anglo-Saxon burials have always interested people because of the range of attractive objects found in the grave. Traditionally these “grave goods” were seen as the personal possessions of the deceased. A more recent view considers some objects to be items placed by mourners at the grave side. Steve will also look at the role of heirlooms and antiques, possibly passed down from one generation to the next, that are for a short period of time in the seventh century, placed within graves.

References
Sherlock, S.J. 2011. Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries in the Tees Valley and Association with Neolithic and Later Monuments, in S. Brooks, S. Harrington and A. Reynolds (eds) Studies in Early Anglo-Saxon Art and Archaeology: Papers in Honour of Martin G Welch, BAR British Series 527, 112–120. Oxford: Archaeopress.
Sherlock, S.J. 2012.  A Royal Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Street House, Loftus, North East Yorkshire. Hartlepool: Tees Archaeology Monograph 6.
Sherlock, S.J. and Simmons, M. 2008. The Lost Royal Cult of Street House, Yorkshire. British Archaeology 100, 30–37.
Sherlock, S.J. and Welch, M.G. 1992. An Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Norton, Cleveland. London: Council for British Archaeology Research Report 82.
Sherlock, S.J. and Welch, M.G. 1992. Anglo-Saxon Objects from Maltby, Cleveland. Durham Archaeological Journal 8, 71–76.

See you there!

Kind Regards,

Spencer Carter | TAS Chair & eCommunications

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 28 Oct | Clive Waddington: Prehistoric archaeology at Low Hauxley

Prehistoric archaeology and landscape change in the North Sea Basin: Investigations at Low Hauxley


Dr Clive Waddington, Archaeological Research Services Ltd

7.30pm in Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU

Please remember to bring your membership card or a completed application form to join. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door. Refreshments will be available at the end of the lecture.

Mesolithic to Bronze Age activity on an eroding cliff face site at Low Hauxley, Northumberland, has been known since an evaluation excavation in 1983.

 

CW_FlintClive presents the latest results from a new large-scale and widely publicised investigation of the site. Finds include substantial and complex geo-archaeological sequences with multiple phases of Mesolithic settlement, Neolithic occupation, Bronze Age burial, Iron Age and Romano-British settlement with structures, a large lithic assemblage, human bones, ceramics, and botanical macrofossils. The results have relevance both for wider studies of prehistoric Britain but also for understanding prehistoric settlement around the North Sea Basin and the effects of sea level rise since the last ice age.

I look forward to seeing you!

Kind Regards,

Spencer Carter | TAS Chair & eCommunications

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 30 Sep | Stone Age finds from Carlisle and Isle of Man

FH7.30pm in Stockton Central Library TS18 1TU
FINDS HANDLING!

CNDRflint_400pxPlease remember to bring your membership card or a completed application form to join. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door. Refreshments will be available at the end of the lecture.

Antony Dickson of Oxford Archaeology North will tell us about two quite incredible early prehistoric sites – and equally challenging excavations. The Carlisle ring road dig included Neolithic wooden tridents in a still-waterlogged ancient river channel and caused Europe to run out of plastic sample tubs.

Ronaldsway Meso structure during excavationAn extension to Ronaldsway airport runway on the Isle of Man had to be conducted at night to avoid aircraft and revealed, amongst many finds, a burnt Mesolithic hut (if not a village), and burning means preservation.

I look forward to seeing you!

Kind Regards,

Spencer Carter | TAS Chair & eCommunications

TAS LECTURE | Reminder for Tue 24 Jun | English Civil Wars NE Military Activity

Dear TAS Members and Friends,

This is a reminder for our next lecture at Stockton Central Library*, Tuesday 24 June kicking off at 7.30pm. Don’t forget to bring your membership card. Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door, but annual membership makes much more sense. Find out how to join on our website.

*Visit our website for travel directions.

Lecture Reminder

June 24 | The North East turned upside down: Military activity during the English Civil Wars | 2014 BONUS LECTURE

FINDS HANDLING!

Phil Philo | Middlesbrough Museums

CivilWar_DE GHEYN, Jacob 16072014 marks the 370th anniversary of the Battle of Marston Moor, probably one of the most decisive and best known events of the English Civil Wars. The North East is not noted for other landmark events during this conflict but its people played a significant role during the wars. Phil’s talk will give the background to the conflict, particularly the first civil war, the armies, their equipment and tactics, and try to give a more detailed look at the importance of engagements fought, in particular at Piercebridge, Yarm and Guisborough early on in the war, to the later sieges at York, Scarborough, Newcastle and Skipton.

Kind Regards,

Spencer Carter | TAS Chair & eCommunications